Civil rights to African Americans after World War II

Civil rights to African Americans after World War II

Why were Congress and the federal government unwilling to grant greater civil rights to African Americans after World War II, especially considering the service of hundreds of thousands of African American men and women in fighting that war? What kept the U.S. from focusing on its own social justice problems after vanquishing Hitler and totalitarian Japan?

 

Answer

Why Were Congress and the Federal Government Unwilling to Grant Greater Civil Rights to African Americans After World War II?         

Civil rights refer to a class of rights that protect an individual’s freedom from infringement by either social organizations, private individuals or governments (Verney & In Richardson, 2020). Despite the service of hundreds of thousands of African American men and women who took part in the World War II, the congress and federal government were unwilling to grant greater civil rights to African Americans because of the perceived white supremacy. The Congress and Federal government were constituted by a majority of whites who strongly believed in white supremacy thus hesitant to grant African Americans equal rights (Boucher, 2019). Also, majority of the congress and federal government was constituted of whites who did not want blacks to get more representation through the granting of voting rights. Lastly, granting African Americans greater civil rights would result in them owning lands thus denying former slave owners cheap and affordable labor (Boucher, 2019).

The post-war period was marked by a rebellion against the second class citizenship accorded to African Americans. This was accompanied by resistance to discrimination and racial segregation with strategies such as boycotts, marches and protests followed by efforts to legally challenge segregation through courts. These efforts were crowned by the Brown decision in 1954, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Voting Rights Act in 1965 that helped bring down the web of legislation binding African Americans to Second class citizens (Verney & In Richardson, 2020).

What Kept the U.S. From Focusing On Its Own Social Justice Problems After Vanquishing Hitler and Totalitarian Japan?

After the world war two, the United States went through unprecedented economic growth which kept the government from addressing the social injustices in the country after vanguishing Hitler and Totalitarian Japan (Boucher, 2019). The emergence of United States as a superpower had the government focus solely on its global impact yet the country was collapsing. The voting rights discrimination, labor strikes, which involved boycotts and sit-ins, resulted in the creation of civil rights movements aimed at decreasing the racial segregation and discrimination against African American citizens (Boucher, 2019).

 

 

References

Boucher, D. (2019). The Social and Economic Injustices of Colonialism and Post colonialism.     Bradford, West Yorkshire: Emerald Publishing Limited.

Verney, K., & In Richardson, R. (2020). The debate on Black Civil Rights in America.      Manchester: Manchester University Press

 

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *